ISSN: 0973-7510

E-ISSN: 2581-690X

Hariom Sharan1 , Aditya Prakash Mishra2 and Ritu Mishra3
1Department of Microbiology, Rama Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur – 208 002, India.
2Department of Radiodiagnosis, Rama Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur – 208 002, India.
3Department of OBG, Rama Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur – 208 002, India.
J Pure Appl Microbiol. 2013;7(3):2309-2314
© The Author(s). 2013
Received: 30/10/2012 | Accepted: 26/12/2012 | Published: 30/09/2013
Abstract

Surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a significant problem following an operation and the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection. The current study was carried out on 4500 surgeries. SSI was detected in 950 patients, giving the infection rate of 23.75%. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 250/820 (30.49 %); of which 49/250 (19.6 %) were MRSA.This was followed by E.coli 170/820 (20.73 %),CONS 115/820 (14.02 %) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 111/820 (13.53 %). Among the E.coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae 112/170 (65.88 %) and 66/82 (80.49 %) isolates were ESBL producer respectively, giving an overall 70.64 % of ESBL producer. Most of the organisms were multi drug resistant. The high rate of resistance to many antibiotics underscored the need for a policy that could promote a more rationale use of antibiotics. Preoperative hair removal, smoking, order of operation, people in operation theatre, type of anaesthesia, pre-existing illness and preoperative skin preparation significantly predicted SSI. Rationale use of antibiotics and prevention strategies focusing on factors associated with SSI is necessary in order to reduce SSI rate in our setting.

Keywords

Surgical site infection (SSI), Antibiotic resistance pattern, Predictors, MRSA, ESBL

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