ISSN: 0973-7510

E-ISSN: 2581-690X

Feleke Moges1 , T. Prabhakar1, T. Ramana2, G. Sankar, K. Prasanth1, M. Srinu1 and G.V. Phani Bhushan1
1Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Division, A.U. College of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
Andhra University, India.
2Department of Biotechnology, College of Science and Technology, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam – 530 003, India.
J Pure Appl Microbiol. 2009;3(1):157-162
© The Author(s). 2009
Received: 12/11/2008 | Accepted: 21/03/2009| Published: 30/04/2009
Abstract

The objective of the present study was to isolate antibiotic producing actinomycetes from marine samples of hard corals collected from the Bay of Bengal at Vellapatti, Tamil Nadu, India. A total of 22 morphologically different actinomycetes were recovered. About 40% of the isolates showed activity against Bacillus subtilis followed by Staphylococcus aureus (36.4%), Escherichia coli (18.2%) and Shigella flexinari (13.6%). Streptomyces and Micromonospora were the major genera identified. Three of the Streptomyces species showed antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of multidrug resistant human pathogens. Two of these showed inhibitory activity against multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa while isolate CS19/13 exhibited strong activity against multi-drug resistant S. aureus (including methicillin). Forty percent of all isolates exhibited antagonistic activity against one or more bacterial pathogens. Hence, in the search for new antibiotics, for combating multidrug resistant pathogens, hard corals might be a potentially rich source of marine actinomycetes producing novel antibiotics.

Keywords

Hard corals, actinomycetes, multi-drug resistant

Article Metrics

Article View: 0

Share This Article

© The Author(s) 2009. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License which permits unrestricted use, sharing, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.