ISSN: 0973-7510

E-ISSN: 2581-690X

Mini-Review | Open Access
Gomathi Munusamy1 and Ramesh Shanmugam2
1Department of Community Health Nursing, Centre of Postgraduate Studies, Faculty of Nursing, Lincoln University College, Selangor, Malaysia.
2Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, Centre of Postgraduate Studies, Faculty of Nursing, Lincoln University College, Selangor, Malaysia.
Article Number: 7389 | © The Author(s). 2022
J Pure Appl Microbiol. 2022;16(3):1595-1607. https://doi.org/10.22207/JPAM.16.3.08
Received: 22 October 2021 | Accepted: 29 May 2022 | Published online: 12 July 2022
Issue online: September 2022
Abstract

Atherosclerosis is the most challenging subsets of coronary artery disease in humans, in which risk factors emerge from childhood, and its prevalence increases with age. Experimental research demonstrates that infections due to bacteria stimulate atherogenic events. Atherosclerosis has complex pathophysiology that is linked with several bacterial infections by damaging the inner arterial wall and heart muscles directly and indirectly by provoking a systemic pro-inflammation and acute-phase protein. Repeated bacterial infections trigger an inflammatory cascade that triggers immunological responses that negatively impact cardiovascular biomarkers includes triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, heat shock proteins, cytokines, fibrinogen, and leukocyte count. Herein, we intended to share the role of bacterial infection in atherosclerosis and evaluate existing evidence of animal and human trials on the association between bacterial infections and atherosclerosis on update.

Keywords

Atherosclerosis, Bacterial infections, Inflammation

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